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Courses

Students who take classes in our department enjoy opportunities to explore various methods and approaches to studying Greek and Roman antiquity. The department itself offers courses in Greek and Latin language and literature as well courses which don't require knowledge of Greek or Latin and examine a wide set of issues pertaining to the literature, history, archaeology and culture of ancient Greece and Rome. These courses often draw on an interdisciplinary perspective and/or on reception studies so as to position our students to understand the multiple meanings that classical antiquity has had throughout the ages.

  • Language courses focus on reading ancient works in their original Greek or Latin. A full sequence of both Greek and Latin from the beginning to the advanced level is available.
  • Other courses involve the study of ancient culture in English translation. For example, "From Homer to Omeros", "Greek Archaeology", and "Women in Antiquity" are accessible to all members of the Vassar community. Another ancient culture course is the Blegen Seminar, taught by a different visiting scholar each year. Recent Blegen courses have included, "Romans, Greeks, and Jews", "Food in the Ancient Mediterranean", and "Introduction to Indo-European linguistics"
  • Ancient History and Culture are also taught in translation. These courses may focus on Greek and Roman history, art, archaeology, or literature.

The department organizes its courses by subject area and level of difficulty. Not every course is offered every year, and the department often teaches special courses on a one-time-only basis.

Further information on the department's majors and correlate sequences is available in "For Students."

Courses

The following information is from the 2018-19 Vassar College Catalogue.

Greek and Roman Studies: I. Introductory

100 Then and Now: Reinterpreting Greece and Rome 1Semester Offered: Spring

Here we are at the beginning of the 21st century, yet all around us we continue to see allusions to and creative engagements with Greek and Roman antiquity. From the bestseller list which features a novel claiming to reveal recently discovered books of the Odyssey to an HBO series that takes place in ancient Rome and comparisons of the post 9/11 United States to the Roman Empire in the news, the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome continue to be viscerally alive and compelling as sources for artistic and cultural production. Why is this so? In this course we examine the ways that the legacies of classical antiquity continue to be felt today and invite us to explore the cultures of Greece and Rome. The course serves as an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Greek and Roman languages, literature, history, and archaeology and the interpretation of these cultures by subsequent civilizations. The course addresses both the complex political, social, intellectual, and cultural settings of the ancient world and the ways in which the study of antiquity can challenge and enrich our experience of the present. To pursue these questions we read ancient texts, examine material artifacts, study linguistic evidence, and engage with creative contemporary responses to antiquity and recent theoretical work on the study of the ancient world. In serving as an overview of the kinds of questions that contemporary culture inspires us to ask of and about antiquity and the materials and approaches that scholars use for their inquiries, the course prepares the student for further work in the department. Rachel Friedman and Bert Lott.

Two 75-minute periods.

101 Civilization in Question 1

(Same as CLCS 101 and MRST 101) In the past, college curricula in this country were often organized around the idea of the "Great Books" of "Western Civilization." Today though, the very idea of a Western literary canon has been challenged as a vehicle for reinforcing questionable norms and hierarchies and silencing other important perspectives. In this class we read well-known ancient, medieval and Renaissance texts with a view to how they themselves question the civilizations from which they emerge. A unique feature of this class is that it is taught by faculty from three different disciplines who bring a variety of interpretive practices to bear on the texts. This creates a classroom environment in which dialogue is the means to discovery. Students are encouraged to be part of the conversation both during class and in weekly discussion sections. Readings may include such authors as Homer, Aeschylus, Plato, Augustine, Chretien de Troyes, and Machiavelli. Nancy Bisaha, Rachel Friedman, and Christopher Raymond.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods plus extra periods.

102 Cleopatra 1Semester Offered: Fall

A famous historian once wrote "The true history of Antony and Cleopatra will probably never be known; it is buried too deep beneath the version of the victors." This course examines the life and times of Egypt's most famous queen, who was both a Hellenistic monarch, last of a dynasty founded by a companion of Alexander the Great, and a goddess incarnate, Pharaoh of one of the world's oldest societies. However, the ways in which Cleopatra has been depicted over the centuries since her death are equally intriguing, and the course considers versions of Cleopatra from the Romans to Chaucer, Boccacio, Shakespeare, Gauthier, Shaw, and film and television to explore how different authors and societies have created their own image of this bewitching figure. Bert Lott.

Open only to first-year students; satisfies the college requirement for a First-Year Writing Seminar.

Two 75-minute periods.

104 Greek Archaeology 1

This course examines sites and monuments of the ancient Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Classical period. We introduce archaeological methods, examine the history and developement of Greek archaeology from the origins of the field in the 1870's to the present, and trace the chronological development of Greek art and architecture across several major sites including Knossos, Mycenae, Olympia, Delphi, and Athens. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding and interpreting monuments in terms of their political, social, and economic contexts. 

Alternate years. Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

144 Living in the Ancient City 0.5Semester Offered: Fall

(Same as ART 144 and URBS 144) The great Mediterranean cities of Classical Antiquity, Athens in the 5th c. BC and Rome in the 1st-2nd c. CE (along with some of their satellite cities), are synonymous with the rise of western civilization. The city plans and monumental architecture dominate our view, but this course also focuses on the civic institutions housed in the spectacular buildings and the social worlds shaped by the grand public spaces, as well as the cramped working quarters. Neighborhoods of the rich and the poor, their leisure haunts, and places of congregation and entertainment are explored to reveal the rituals of everyday life and their political consequences. Eve D'Ambra.

Second six-week course.

Two 75-minute periods.

182 Lightning Thieves and Clashing Titans: Adapting the Ancient World 1Semester Offered: Fall

From the Percy Jackson series to Spartacus: Blood and Sand, the mythology and history of Greece and Rome continue to provide a source and a setting for new and exciting works of fiction even today. In this course you are invited to explore modern adaptations of ancient tales across a variety of media, from novels and poems to films and graphic novels. We look at why these millennia-old stories have retained their ability to fascinate and inspire, and we also investigate the dynamics of adaptation. How, for example, should an author balance fidelity to ancient sources with the desire to tell a story that resonates today? And how much do these authors' stories tell us about the time and place about which they are writing, as opposed to the time and place in which they are writing? This course builds to a final project where students have the opportunity to compose their own adaptation in a medium of their choosing. Readings may include The Lightning Thief; The Last of the Wine; I, Claudius; Lavinia; and The Three. Thomas Beasley.

Two 75-minute periods.

188 Homer's Iliad in Modern Adaptations 1Semester Offered: Spring

Homer's Iliad, dating from over 2 millennia ago, continues to inspire poets, playwrights and novelists working today. In this class we study contemporary responses to the poem, all of them composed in English within the past five to ten years. The adaptations include poetry, drama and novelistic responses. Among the questions we consider are: Why does the poem, which offers an account of the last year of the mythological war between the Greeks and the Trojans, continue to capture our imagination?  What is it about our current cultural moment that has drawn so many artists to the ancient poem? How can we consider the role that the Homer's poem plays in these modern works while also taking these modern receptions seriously on their own terms? After a close reading of the Iliad, among the modern adaptations we consider are Simon Armitage's The Story of the Iliad (2015), Madeline Miller's The Song of Achilles (2012), David Malouf's Ransom (2011) and Alice Oswald's Memorial (2013). Rachel Friedman.

Two 75-minute periods.

Greek and Roman Studies: II. Intermediate

202 Myth 1Semester Offered: Spring

This course examines ancient myth from a variety of theoretical perspectives. It compares Greek and Roman myth with other mythic traditions and explores different versions of the same myth within Greek and Roman culture. We also consider transformations of ancient myths into modem versions. Literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence provide ways to understand the function of myth in ancient Greek and Roman society. Curtis Dozier.

Two 75-minute periods.

203 Women in Greek and Roman History and Myth 1

(Same as WMST 203) Greek and Roman literary and historical accounts abound with vividly drawn women such as Helen, Antigone, Medea, Livia, and Agrippina, the mother of Nero. But how representative were such figures of the daily lives of women throughout Greek and Roman antiquity? This course investigates the images and realities of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world, from the Greek Late Bronze Age (c. 1200 BCE) to the Roman Empire (up to the III c. CE) by juxtaposing evidence from literature, historical sources, and archaeological material. Throughout, the course examines the complex ways in which ancient women interacted with the institutions of the state, the family, religion, and the arts. 

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

204 Gender and Sexuality in Roman Culture 1

(Same as WMST 204) This course examines in detail the sexual attitudes and behaviors of the ancient Romans and the gender roles that both shaped and were shaped by those attitudes. We study selections from ancient Greek and Roman literature, examine artistic remains, and read articles written by prominent scholars of ancient Rome. While the readings are in roughly chronological order, the course is principally organized by topic (e.g., a day for "Roman pederasty" or "Vestal virgins"). All readings are in English translation.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

210 Art, Myth, and Society in the Ancient Aegean 1

(Same as ART 210) Eve D'Ambra.

Prerequisite(s): ART 105  or ART 106 or coursework in Greek & Roman Studies, or permission of the instructor.

NRO available to non-majors.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

211 Rome: The Art of Empire 1

(Same as ART 211) From humble beginnings to its conquest of most of the known world, Rome dominated the Mediterranean with the power of its empire. Art and architecture gave monumental expression to its political ideology, especially in the building of cities that spread Roman civilization across most of Europe and parts of the Middle East and Africa. Roman art also featured adornment, luxury, and collecting in both public and private spheres. Given the diversity of the people included in the Roman empire and its artistic forms, what is particularly Roman about Roman art? Eve D'Ambra.

Prerequisite(s): ART 105 or ART 106 or one unit in Greek and Roman Studies, or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

215 The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt 1

(Same as ART 215) Ancient Egypt has long fascinated the public with its pyramids, mummies, and golden divine rulers. This course provides a survey of the archaeology, art, and architecture of ancient Egypt from the prehistoric cultures of the Nile Valley through the period of Cleopatra's rule and Roman domination. Topics to be studied include the art of the funerary cult and the afterlife, technology and social organization, and court rituals of the pharaohs, along with aspects of everyday life. Eve D'Ambra.

Prerequisite(s): ART 105 or ART 106 or one unit of Greek and Roman Studies, or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

216 History of the Ancient Greeks 1Semester Offered: Spring

(Same as HIST 216) This course examines the history and culture of the ancient Greeks from the emergence of the city-state in the eighth century BCE to the conquests of Alexander the Great in 335 BCE. In addition to an outline of the political and social history of the Greeks, the course examines several historical, cultural, and methodological topics in depth, including the emergence of writing, Greek colonialism and imperialism, ancient democracy, polytheism, the social structures of Athenian society, and the relationship between Greeks and other Mediterranean cultures. Students both read primary sources (for example, Sappho, Tyrtaios, Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, and Plato) and examine sites and artifacts recovered through archaeology; the development of students' critical abilities to evaluate and use these sources for the study of history is a primary goal of the class. Bert Lott.

217 History of the Ancient Romans 1

(Same as HIST 217) This course examines the history of the ancient Romans from the foundation of their city around the eighth century BCE to the collapse of their Mediterranean Empire in the fifth century CE. The course offers a broad historical outline of Roman history, but focuses on significant topics and moments in Roman history, including the Republican aristocracy, the civil and slave wars of the Late Republic, the foundation of the Empire by Caesar Augustus, urbanism, the place of public entertainments (gladiatorial combats, Roman hunts, chariot races, and theater) in society, the rise of Christianity, the processes of Romanization, and barbarization, and the political decline and fall of the Roman Empire. Students read primary sources such as Plautus, Cicero, Livy, Tacitus, and Suetonius, and secondary accounts dealing with important issues such as slavery, religious persecution and multiculturalism. Students also examine important archaeological sites and artifacts. The development of students' critical abilities to evaluate and use these sources for the study of history is a primary goal of the class. 

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

219 The First Cities: The Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East 1

(Same as ART 219 and URBS 219) The art, architecture, and artifacts of the region comprising ancient Iraq, Iran, Syria, Palestine, and Turkey from 3200 BCE to the conquest of Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE. Beginning with the rise of cities and cuneiform writing in Mesopotamia, course topics include the role of the arts in the formation of states and complex societies, cult practices, trade and military action, as well as in everyday life. How do we make sense of the past through its ruins and artifacts, especially when they are under attack (the destruction wrought by ISIS)? Eve D'Ambra.

Prerequisite(s): ART 105 or 106 or one unit in Greek and Roman Studies, or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

241 Topics in the Construction of Gender 1Semester Offered: Fall

(Same as HIST 241, STS 241, and WMST 241) Topic for 2018/19a: The History of Midwifery. This course examines the history of midwifery from the ancient to the modern world. It considers the traditional roles of midwives as birth attendants, herbal healers, abortionists, therapists and confidants, and members of their communities. Major topics include childbirth practices in the ancient world, the division between gynecological care and obstetrics that occurred in the middle ages, midwives in the medieval Islamic world, the advent and professionalization of male midwives in the early modern period, the technologization of birth in the 20th century, and the modern-day cooperations and schisms between midwives and OBGYNs. Readings include medical manuals and treatises, diaries, fictionalized historical accounts, and legal writings. The course features guest lectures from a homebirth midwife, a nurse midwife, and a doctor. Tara Mulder.

Prerequisite(s): WMST 130 or permission of the instructor.

May be repeated for credit if the topic has changed.

Two 75-minute periods.

283 Digital Odysseus: Mapping Ancient Myths 1Semester Offered: Spring

(Same as MEDS 283) Have you ever wondered just how far Jason traveled to obtain the famous Golden Fleece? Or been curious to see precisely where Odysseus' adventures took him? Exactly where did Hercules complete his many labors—and what did the people who lived in these real-life places think about the demi-god who'd supposedly visited their towns? In this course you're invited to explore these questions and more by digitally mapping ancient myths. Not only do you become proficient with text encoding and digital mapping software—no prior experience expected!—but you also learn how to think about literature spatially by examining the connections between ancient myths and the real-world locations that feature in them. Your work in this course appears in a digital mapping application used by students and teachers alike. Thomas Beasley.

Two 75-minute periods.

285 Sex, Gender and the History of Medicine 1Semester Offered: Fall

(Same as STS 285 and WMST 285) This course looks at topics in the history of medicine that can be traced from their Classical roots into the modern period. Topics include abortion and miscarriage, hysteria, the one/two sex body, dissection, and epilepsy or panic attacks (called the "sacred disease" in antiquity) among others. We look at how disease, pathology, and medical interventions are culturally situated and gendered. For instance, what was "mobile womb" in ancient Greek medicine comes to be hysteria in the 19th century, and has its legacy in modern medical dismissals of women's pain and suffering. Tara Mulder.

Two 75-minute periods.

290 Field Work 0.5 to 1

Prerequisite(s): Special Permission.

298 Independent Study 0.5 to 1Semester Offered: Fall or Spring

Prerequisite(s): Special Permission.

Greek and Roman Studies: III. Advanced

301 Seminar in Classical Civilization 1Semester Offered: Fall

(Same as AFRS 301 and DRAM 301) Topic for 2018/19a: Athenian Drama on an African Stage. In this class we read adaptations of Greek drama from Africa and the African diaspora alongside their Greek intertexts. Among the questions we consider are: the affinity between Greek and African theatrical forms related to their origins in ritual; the use of Greek tragedy to describe the African experience in the New World, and the larger question of the role of the classical in a postcolonial context. Readings include such works as Ola Rotimi's The Gods are not to Blame, Fugard, Kani and Ntshona's The Island, Rita Dove's The Darker Face of the Earth; and Sylvain Bemba's Black Wedding Candles for Blessed Antigone. All readings are in English. Rachel Friedman.

Prerequisite(s): previous course work in Greek and Roman Studies or permission of the instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

302 The Blegen Seminar 1

The course is offered by the Blegen Distinguished Visiting Research Professor or the Blegen Research Fellow in Classics, appointed annually to pursue research and lecture on his/her scholarly concerns in classical antiquity. We encourage students to take note of the fact that each Blegen Seminar is uniquely offered and will not be repeated. Since the topic changes every year, the course may be taken for credit more than once.

 

Prerequisite(s): previous coursework in Greek and Roman Studies or a field related to the topic, or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

314 Seminar in Ancient Art 1

(Same as ART 314 and URBS 314)

Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.

One 2-hour period.

360 a or b Senior Thesis 1Semester Offered: Fall or Spring

One semester senior thesis. Seniors only

361 Senior Thesis 0.5Semester Offered: Fall

Full Year Thesis (1/2 unit per semester). Seniors Only.

362 Senior Thesis 0.5Semester Offered: Spring

Full Year Thesis (1/2 unit per semester). Seniors Only.

363 a or b Senior Project 0.5Semester Offered: Fall or Spring

Extended writing or other project elected concurrently with a seminar in Greek and Roman Studies. Seniors only.

Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor of the concurrent seminar.

380 How to be a man in Ancient Rome 1Semester Offered: Spring

The world-spanning and militarily powerful Roman Empire is often invoked as a model for "traditional" masculinity, but inspection of literary and historical sources reveals a much more complex and multi-faceted concept of masculinity than modern representations of gladiators, centurions, and orators would lead one to assume. This course examines ancient Roman debates around masculinity as a way of thinking about contemporary constructions of manhood. Topics to be considered include gender roles in ancient Rome, homosexuality, invective, class and status, performance and policing of masculinity, and gender non-conforming behavior in antiquity. Curtis Dozier.

Two 75-minute periods.

399 Senior Independent Study 0.5 to 1

Courses in Greek Language and Literature: I. Introductory

125 Elementary Greek 1

Introduction to the language. 

Open to all classes. No previous Greek is required.

Yearlong course 125-GRST 126.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Four 50-minute periods.

126 Elementary Greek 1

Introduction to the language. 

Open to all classes.

Yearlong course GRST 125-126.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Four 50-minute periods.

127 Intensive Elementary Greek 2Semester Offered: Spring

An intensive introduction to the fundamentals of classical Greek grammar and syntax. Students with no background in ancient Greek learn to read Homer, Plato, Greek tragedy, Herodotus, and other classical texts after one semester's intensive work. This course is the equivalent of GRST 125 - 126 and fulfills the language requirement by itself. Rachel Friedman.

Four 75-minute periods plus one 50-minute grammar drill.

Courses in Greek Language and Literature: II. Intermediate

225 Intermediate Greek 1Semester Offered: Fall

Authors may include Sophokles, Euripides, Xenophon, Lysias, and Plato. In addition to consolidating knowledge of grammar, the selection of passages brings into focus important aspects of Athenian culture. Tara Mulder.

Prerequisite(s): GRST 105   -GRST 106    or permission of the instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

226 Intermediate Greek: Topics in Greek Literature 1Semester Offered: Spring

(Same as GRST 321) Topic for 2018/19b: How to Win an Argument in Ancient Greece." Those who have persuaded and do persuade anyone about anything are shapers of lying discourse . . ." So the Greek orator Gorgias remarks about the power of speech in his famous defense of Helen of Troy, but these words have special resonance at this contemporary moment, when truthiness blurs the lines between truth and falsehood, and fake news has the ability to impact elections. In this course we explore the power, practice and theory of persuasive speech by reading, in ancient Greek, oratorical works by Gorgias, Antiphon and Isocrates. In addition to studying the structure, argumentation and stylistic elements of Greek oratory, we also investigate the civic context of persuasive discourse in classical Athens, as well as the debates that raged over what constitutes an authentic attempt to seek truth and what is 'mere' rhetoric.Thomas Beasley.

This course should be elected by students before electing any advanced Greek course in the department. Students enrolled in GRST 226 have an extra hour of grammar review and students enrolled in GRST 321 have longer Greek assignments.

Two 75-minute periods.

Courses in Greek Language and Literature: III. Advanced

321 Advanced Greek: Topics in Greek Literature 1Semester Offered: Spring

(Same as GRST 226) Topic for 2018/19b: How to Win an Argument in Ancient Greece. "Those who have persuaded and do persuade anyone about anything are shapers of lying discourse . . ." So the Greek orator Gorgias remarks about the power of speech in his famous defense of Helen of Troy, but these words have special resonance at this contemporary moment, when truthiness blurs the lines between truth and falsehood, and fake news has the ability to impact elections. In this course we explore the power, practice and theory of persuasive speech by reading, in ancient Greek, oratorical works by Gorgias, Antiphon and Isocrates. In addition to studying the structure, argumentation and stylistic elements of Greek oratory, we also investigate the civic context of persuasive discourse in classical Athens, as well as the debates that raged over what constitutes an authentic attempt to seek truth and what is 'mere' rhetoric. Thomas Beasley.

This course should be elected by students before electing any advanced Greek course in the department. Students enrolled in GRST 226 have an extra hour of grammar review and students enrolled in GRST 321 have longer Greek assignments.

Two 75-minute periods.

322 Greek Tragedy 1Semester Offered: Fall

A reading of a play by Sophokles or Euripides. Careful study of the text helps us to understand the playwright's style. We also consider how the play examines and responds to the historical, social and political conditions of Athens in the fifth century BCE. Rachel Friedman.

Prerequisite(s): two units in 200-level courses in the language or permission of the instructor.

Offered in alternate years.

Two 75-minute periods.

323 Homer 1

Extensive selections from the Iliad, the Odyssey, and/or Homeric Hymns with attention given to oral theory, thematic structure, and social issues raised by the poems. 

Prerequisite(s): two units in 200-level courses in the language or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.​

Two 75-minute periods.

Courses in Latin Language and Literature: I. Introductory

145 Elementary Latin 1Semester Offered: Fall

Introduction to the language. Thomas Beasley.

Open to all classes. No previous Latin is required.

Yearlong course 145-GRST 146.

Four 50-minute periods.

146 Elementary Latin 1Semester Offered: Spring

Introduction to the language. Thomas Beasley.

Open to all classes.

Yearlong course GRST 145-146.

Four 50-minute periods.

Courses in Latin Language and Literature: II. Intermediate

245 Intermediate Latin I 1Semester Offered: Fall

Selected readings from authors such as Plautus, Cicero, Catullus, Caesar, Sallust, and Virgil. The selection of readings is designed to consolidate knowledge of grammar, provide an introduction to the translation of continuous, unadapted Latin, and highlight interesting features of Roman culture in the last two centuries of the Republic. Bert Lott.

Prerequisite(s): GRST 145-GRST 146 or permission of the instructor or chair.

Three 50-minute periods.

246 Intermediate Latin II 1Semester Offered: Spring

Authors may include Horace, Livy, Ovid, Seneca, Petronius, Suetonius, and Virgil. Readings are selected to illustrate the diversity of literary forms that flourished in the early Empire and the interaction of literature with society, politics, and private life. Tara Mulder.

Prerequisite(s): GRST 245 or permission of the instructor.

Three 50-minute periods.

Courses in Latin Language and Literature: III. Advanced

341 Topics in Latin Literature 1Semester Offered: Spring

Topic for 2018/19b: Latin Letters: This course examines a range of Latin texts that were, or present themselves, as letters.  These include the letters of Cicero, Seneca, Pliny, and Fronto, as well as "documentary" letters (letters preserved on wood or papyrus), epistolary prefaces, and various poetic epistles.  One set of questions and issues to be discussed revolve around formal characteristics and genre: what makes a text recognizable to its intended audience as a "letter," and how does this recognition affect the text's reception?  Moreover, letters are an invaluable source for the study of Roman history and culture. Many of the characteristics that define letters make them particularly valuable to the historian trying to recover not just factual details but the thoughts and opinions of the Romans who wrote and read them.  J. Bert Lott.

Prerequisite: GRST 246 or permission of the instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.

342 Virgil 1

Selections from the Eclogues, Georgics, or Aeneid. Subjects of study include the artistry of the Virgilian hexameter, the relationship of Virgil's works to their Greek models, and general topics such as his conception of destiny, religion, and the human relation to nature. 

Prerequisite(s): GRST 246 or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.

Two 75-minute periods.

343 Tacitus 1

Close readings from the works of the imperial historian and ethnographer Tacitus. In connection with further developing students' reading skills, the class focuses on particular literary, cultural, or historical issues. 

Prerequisite(s): GRST 246 or permission of the instructor.

Not offered in 2018/19.

344 Roman Lyric and Elegy 1Semester Offered: Fall

Poems of Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, Catullus and Ovid with attention given to poetic form, the influence of poets on each other, and the view they give us of Roman society in the first century BCE. Curtis Dozier.

Prerequisite(s): GRST 246 or permission of the instructor.

Two 75-minute periods.